INCREASE FAMILY FOOD SOVEREIGNTY

 
Bienvenida Aguilar of El Tule with her children and abundant vegetables

Bienvenida Aguilar of El Tule with her children and abundant vegetables

As farm families grow more and more of their food supply and increase the variety of plants they grow and eat, they become less vulnerable to crop failure and exorbitant market prices.     Their food supply becomes healthier and more sustainable when they change from traditional techniques of burning fields and applying toxic chemicals to using organic fertilizers and pesticides.

 

SVH farmers teach each other to use updated practices of composting and mulching in both their kitchen gardens and their crop fields.  They learn to build chicken coops to protect eggs and chickens. They learn to make their own fertilizers and insecticides from natural local materials such as forest litter fungus, manure, plant cuttings and ashes.    

Anibal Rios of El Cablotal teaches people from other SVH villages to build a chicken coop

Anibal Rios of El Cablotal teaches people from other SVH villages to build a chicken coop

Children in El Chol are intrigued by the organic pesticide from forest litter fungus and vegetables.    

Children in El Chol are intrigued by the organic pesticide from forest litter fungus and vegetables.  


In El Chol, one of the SVH villages, farmers learned from a Vecinos farmer from southern Honduras how to make effective fertilizer and pesticide out of the fungus growing in decaying leaves on the forest floor.   (Photo B3) Six farmers formed a Group of Six to make organic fertilizer and pesticide and use them on their own crops. These farmers saw improved crop yields the first year. They share these results with other farmers in their community and with other SVH villages.  

Healthy repeatability is the essence of farming sustainability